Sunday, September 25, 2011

Folios, Persians, and Cheese Curd

I'm back now from my creative writing conference in Cedar City, and I've returned with a few more poems, teaching strategies, and more fresh cheddar cheese curd than one person can consume. No, really.
Here's a photo of me taking my first bite EVER of cheese curd. Our colleague Dean, born and raised in Delta, UT insisted that we stop in Beaver, UT for this infamous cheese curd. Despite that the food has the most inedible sounding name on Planet Earth, I'd say it was pretty darn tasty when it was fresh. But a couple hours later, curd cheese is rubbery at best.

Dean insisted we stop, and, really, how does one say no to reputable cheese?
Here's a photo of me in front of the glorified cheese store. You know how you go into a 7-11 and find a wall of soda and booze coolers? Glass doors and the whole bit? This place was the same way, but with cheese. You could get any kind of cheese from the "wall o' cheese" on the side of the store. I've never seen anything like it.

I actually had to ask someone what DFA stood for. Oops. heh. heh. I guess this "farm-girl"missed that day in 4-H.
One of the coolest experiences, aside from the royal cheese, was viewing the original Shakespearean Folios on loan from Washington, D.C. held in the gallery in the basement of SUU's campus library.
The other corner of the case has a censor that apparently alerts Washington if anything fishy happens with the case or texts. I dared Mike to lick the case, but he wouldn't do it. I just wanted to see if saliva would bring down the cavalry. P.S. the big one is the folio.

For those who may not know, folios are the "complete" works of Shakespeare, the 1st ever to be published as an omnibus. (It didn't actually have all of his plays, but close.) We got to look at them in a glass case and smile at how all the lower case s's looked like f's. It made reading Shakespeare even more challenging.

Mini Shakespearean plays
Additionally, I got to meet and plug my blog to author, Firoozeh Dumas, who wrote Funny in Farsi in addition to other things. She is a beautiful Iranian American woman with sharp features and the best taste in violet billowing scarfs. In a side note, I had been deemed the friendliest member of our party at this conference (by other colleagues), and ironically, I forgot to ask Dumas if I could take a photo of us for the blog. Damn. (Here's one I found online though.)

Ah well. Instead you get the traditional feet photo and this story about Dumas. Her favorite word in the English language is "serendipity", which apparently gets it's name from an island called Serendip. Never does one plan to land there, it only happens on accident. She told it much more beautifully and with a humorists flair of course.
Teacher feet.


Then back at the conference...
Here's a poem I wrote that was inspired by this line of a poem called "You Begin" by Margaret Atwood:

"Then the world which is round and has only the colors of these nine crayons."

The red crayon of absolutes.
The black of cultural misunderstanding.
The white of superior blandness.
No grey.
The blue of sadness but not the depths of sorrow, depression, and melancholy songs.
The yellow crayon of childhood innocence.
No grey.
The pink of feminine constraints and societal demands.
The green of the earth, cordoned off on the globe by blue globs; a simple division.
No grey.
The brown of dirt, of filth, of muddy waters...and minds.
The orange of sunsets, a color that bleeds emotions and hope. Orange is the mother of new colors.

It's still pretty raw, but as we were taught this weekend, writing isn't always about perfection.
Fun conference.
And...done.

5 comments:

  1. Oooh! There is an identical cheese store (same name, even) in Logan. That's where I lost my cheese curd virginity. They taste great, but I can't handle food that squeaks as I chew.
    My Canadian great grandfather used to eat poutine, which is french fries, cheese curds and gravy. I could never bring myself to try it.

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  2. Yours may be teacher feet...mine are obviously rheumatic and swollen... :(

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  3. Brandi, there's a definite squeakiness about it. And in regards to the poutine...eww.

    Ashley, they are not as bad as you think they are. Plus, they'll heal. =)

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  4. I have heard nothing but rave reviews about Canadian poutine. I want to go to Canada just to try it. We have a version of it in a restaurant here and it is TO DIE FOR!!! Seriously. It's worth every calorie.

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  5. Well then, I might just have to elope...uh...I mean vacation to Canada with you to test that theory.

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